Posts Tagged ‘beck insurance’

Contact Beck Insurance for your full Farm Insurance assessment today!

Friday, December 7th, 2018

Beck Insurance Agency has the experience and expertise required to identify and measure your farms’ exposure to loss….and the markets and tools necessary to create a sound plan to properly manage those risks.

Our comprehensive plans provide coverage for your primary home, rental dwellings, farm buildings, machinery, tools, autos, heavy trucks, grain handling equipment, farm and personal liability, livestock, fluctuating schedules for grain, seed and fertilizer, pollution, extra expense, succession planning with life and long term care, health, medicare supplements, and more.

Farm Insurance

So now that your bins are full and your machinery is being put away, give Beck Insurance Agency a call at 419-446-2777.

Let us demonstrate what we can do for you and your operation.

Joe Buller joins Beck Insurance Agency!

Thursday, December 6th, 2018

Beck Insurance is pleased to announce the hiring of Joe Buller.

Commercial Insurance, Business Insurance, Farm Insurance, Joe Buller

Joe comes to Beck Insurance with 22 years of insurance experience.  He started his insurance career in 1996 and has experience at both the carrier and agency levels.  Joe grew up in a farming community in southwestern Minnesota and relocated to the Monclova, Ohio area a few years ago.

Joe will be focusing his time on Commercial Risks, Farms, Life, and Long Term Care.

Please contact Joe for all your commercial / business insurance needs!

jbuller@beckinsurance.com  /  419-446-2777  /  Online Here

Thank a Farmer Today!

Thursday, October 18th, 2018

Today, 10/12/2018, is National Farmers Day so take some time to thank a farmer!

Top 10 Fascinating Farming Facts For National Farmer’s

  1. Farming employs more than 24 million American workers.  (17% of the total workforce)
  2. Agricultural efficiency has increased over the past century from 27.5 acres / worker in 1890 to 740 acres / worker in 1990.
  3. Seeds had to be scattered by hand until Jethro Tull’s seed drill (developed in 1701) made it possible to plant seeds in rows, which could then be easily hoed.
  4. The word “farm” is from the Old French ferme, meaning to “rent, lease,” and the Latin firmare, “to fix, settle, confirm, strengthen.”
  5. In 1954, the number of tractors on farms surpassed the number of horses and mules for the first time.
  6. Approximately 60% of the farmers in the United States are 55 years old or older.  Aging farmers have led to concern about the long-term health of family farms.
  7. Farmers today produce 262% more food with 2% fewer inputs (such as seeds, labor, fertilizers) than they did in 1950.
  8. Raising beef cattle is the single largest segment of American agriculture.  The United States produces more beef than any other country.
  9. Farmers often plant tall, dense trees on the edges of fruit farms.  These trees provide windbreak, which helps prevent soil erosion.
  10. More than 100 agricultural crops in the U.S. are pollinated by bees.  In fact, one out of three bites of food people eat is thanks to honeybees.

Source:  https://www.factretriever.com/farming-facts

Beck Insurance Agency specializes in and has the knowledge, experience, and markets to effectively manage the unique exposures to risk that today’s farmers face.  Call Beck Insurance at 419-446-2777, drop us an email at info@beckinsurance.com, or submit your request online here to begin the review process.

Wait to Text!

Friday, September 7th, 2018

Jordyn Wieber, partnering with Auto-Owners Insurance, speaks on the importance of not texting while driving.

W82TXT

While this video is over six years old, the message is more important today than ever.  Distracted driving is at an all time high and we must reverse this trend.  Please wait to text!

 

Why We Ask. Life Insurance Matters.

Monday, August 20th, 2018

Here is a moving video courtesy of Pekin Insurance on the importance of Life Insurance for you and your loved ones.

A new widow left with inadequate life insurance urges every family to make sure they have enough. In this Pekin Insurance video, new widow Catina Lawyer says that life insurance matters for everyone, even younger people, and explains what a difference good life insurance would have made for her.

Please contact Beck Insurance Agency today for a life insurance review. Click or call 877-446-2325 today.

10 of the Best Lake Safety Tips Boat Owners Need to Avoid Accidents

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

What’s better than a day on the lake? Safety tips to make sure you have as much fun as possible while staying safe.

Fishing. Swimming. Sailing. These are but a few of the fun things you can do when you take your boat out on the lake. Safety tips can add to the fun by ensuring you and your friends don’t get injured or have an accident, leaving you stranded. Because no matter how much fun you have on the water, it feels good to get home and crawl into bed at the end of the day.

For some boaters, lake safety tips might not seem especially relevant. Waters are generally calm, visibility is excellent, and you’re probably just cruising. The reality, however, is that the majority of boating accidents happen on sunny days in calm waters. And according to the U.S. Coast Guard, accidents in lakes, rivers, ponds, and reservoirs account for nearly ten times as many accidents as those that happen in ocean waters.

This isn’t meant to scare you, though. Being aware and informed are essential parts of having fun. Follow these tips for a guaranteed good time on—and in—the water.

Boat Safety

Boat Safety

10 Lake Safety Tips

1. Follow your boating safety checklist.
Your boat safety checklist is your key to ensuring a good time on the lake. Use your checklist to make sure you don’t forget important safety items.

2. Boat defensively.
Be aware of your surroundings and what other boaters are doing. Watch out for wakes and other hazards like sandbars, submerged tree limbs, and debris.

3. Boat courteously.
Take it slow in populated areas, and be conscious of your wake.

4. Wear a lifejacket.
At the very least, there should be one lifejacket for each person on your boat, and children should always have a lifejacket on.

5. Keep an eye on the weather.
Just because it’s calm when you cast off doesn’t mean the weather won’t change. Check the forecast before you take your boat out and know what to expect.

6. Check your surroundings before swimming.
Don’t let anyone jump off the boat before carefully checking the surroundings. There may be large rocks or other hazards in the water that are just deep enough to be out of sight, but still dangerous.

7. Be constantly aware of children.
If a child is missing, check the water immediately. Seconds count.

8. Don’t drink the lake water.
Lake water can be full of microorganisms, some of which can cause severe illness.

9. Know how to escape from strong currents when swimming.
Everyone on your boat needs to know how to get out of strong currents. While this might not be an issue on a calm lake, if you’re boating on a river or in the Great Lakes, it can be a concern. The first step is to remain calm and don’t fight the current. Try to swim parallel to the shore or float until the current subsides, then call for help. The same goes for river currents: relax and go with the current. Swim toward shore if you can, but fighting against the current will only deplete your energy.

10. Know what drowning looks like.
The last thing anyone wants to think about when you’re heading out for a day on the lake is drowning, but that fact is, this knowledge could save a life. According to WebMD, someone waving their arms and calling for help may be in distress, they may need help, and it’s important to recognize that and get help to them quickly. However, active drowning looks very different. Our physiological response to drowning is a “silent, almost calm behavior.”

Water rescue expert Francesco Pia, Ph.D., points out what someone drowning will look like:
•Silent: There’s no spare breath to call for help.
•Bobbing up and down: His mouth sinks below the water’s surface, pops up just enough to breathe and sinks back down.
•Stiff-armed: Instead of waving for help, his arms are out to the side, hands pressed down on the water to keep him afloat. He can’t even reach out to grab a life preserver.
•Still: He won’t be kicking. His body will be straight up and down, almost like he’s standing in the water.

Any time you’re at the lake, safety tips are a vital part of having a good time. And the more you know, the more power you have to ensure the best time possible for you, your family, and your friends.

Courtesy of Pekin Insurance, “Beyond the Expected”.  Original content here.

Home and Auto Insurance Quotes

Tuesday, July 17th, 2018

Interested in home and auto insurance quotes?  Has it been awhile since you last looked?  Are you confident that your coverage provides adequate protection against financial devastation?  Are your premiums fair for the coverage being carried?

The insurance industry as a whole has done the buying public a great disservice with their continual “cheapest insurance is best” marketing.  Everyone is going to save you hundreds by switching to them, but what protection are you getting in return?  What good does it do if the worst happens and you are financially ruined?

If any of this concerns you, please give Beck Insurance a call for free, no obligation review and quotes.  We will evaluate your needs, identify exposures and propose plans to do just what insurance is intended to do in the first place….protect you.

Natalie Grieser & Kylie Schultz, two of our personal home and auto insurance specialists…are ready to quote your business and earn your trust.  Contact one of them today.

Phone 419-446-2777  /  Online Request Here  /  Email – Natalie@beckinsurance.com or kylie@beckinsurance.com

 

7 Tips to Help Keep Your Teen Driver Safe

Friday, May 25th, 2018

Getting a driver’s license is an exciting time for teens, but it can be stressful for parents. Drivers who are 16 have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age, and 20% of teens have an accident in their first year of driving.

Like other drivers, teens have some good and bad habits. The good—they are twice as likely to wear seat belts as their parents. The bad—56% of teens use their phones while driving.

Helping create good driving habits involves talking to your teen and being a good example yourself. Some areas to discuss include:

•Phone usage. Avoid talking on the phone. If necessary, use a hands-free device. Absolutely NO texting, social media, or other Internet usage.

•Seat belts. Always wear them and insist your passengers do too.

•Speeding. Obey the speed limit—going over the limit doesn’t add up to getting there much faster.

•Passenger distractions. The more people in the car, the more likely you are to be distracted.

•Plan your playlist. Turn on your playlist before you start driving, and don’t keep changing the song. If you’re listening to the radio, avoid changing the channel. At highway speeds, your car will travel more than the length of a football field in the time it takes to look down at a radio for just a few seconds.

•Yellow means caution. Don’t speed up to chase a yellow light. Likewise, be careful when the light turns green and watch for drivers who may be running a red.

•Say something. If you’re a passenger and feel unsafe, speak up!

When both parents and children pledge to drive safely and hold each other accountable, it is most effective. Agree on rules they—and you—will follow behind the wheel.

Credit to Acuity Insurance!

Kylie Schultz moves from customer service to sales and consulting role.

Thursday, May 10th, 2018

Beck Insurance Agency is pleased to announce that Kylie Schultz has moved into a sales and consulting role. Since 2016, Kylie has focused primarily on customer service while learning the industry, products, carriers, and processes.

Kylie’s role going forward will be in personal lines, focusing on Home and Auto Insurance as well as other lines that tend to go along with that.  (boat, RV, motorcycles…..)

Kylie’s objective is to identify and solve your coverage issues by providing solutions and other options available to you, at the fairest rate possible.

She can be reached at kylie@beckinsurance.com / 419-446-2777 / 877-446-2325 (BECK) / Or here via the web

 

 

How to Request an Upgrade to Your DOT Rating

Monday, May 7th, 2018

Though your team does a good job managing your operations and you’re proud of your safety performance, you still ended up with a Conditional or Unsatisfactory rating. In other words, the FMCSA auditor has determined that your company failed to have “adequate safety management controls in place to ensure compliance with the safety fitness standard.”

We all understand why a Satisfactory safety rating is important to motor carriers. Negative ratings can bring many repercussions—your fleet is scrutinized on roadways, customers may have concerns about you hauling their goods, there can be a reluctance to pass on available rate increases offered to better-rated carriers, you may get questions from your insurance company’s underwriters and loss control people, and it can be difficult to attract quality drivers. The best drivers tend to align themselves with well-managed carriers who are not being scrutinized by enforcement officers.

One of the interesting things I notice when visiting motor carriers—especially with smaller, well-managed trucking companies that have been in business for many years and have not had large safety issues—is that they can be unaware of how FMCSA’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program works and how it can drastically affect their company. CSA’s Safety Management System (SMS) uses a motor carrier’s data from roadside inspections, crash reports, and investigations to calculate performance in the 7 Behavioral Analysis Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs): unsafe driving, hours-of-service compliance, driver fitness, controlled substances and alcohol, vehicle maintenance, hazardous materials compliance, and crash indicator. Based on BASIC CSA scores, FMCSA determines what interventions are taken against a carrier.

Following a compliance review, one of three safety ratings is issued—Satisfactory, Conditional, or Unsatisfactory—based on the following categories:

1.Documented, adequate safety management controls.
2.Frequency and severity of regulatory violations received by motor carrier.
3.Frequency and severity of driver and vehicle regulatory violations.
4.Frequency and severity of out-of-service driver and vehicle violations.
5.A pattern demonstrating an increase or decrease in similar types of regulatory violations.
6.Frequency of crashes and incident rate are indicators of preventable incidents, whether they are increasing or decreasing.
7.Number and severity of violations of FMCSA regulations.

If you receive a Conditional or Unsatisfactory rating, the first step in obtaining a Satisfactory rating is to understand the deficiencies and controls that were deemed inadequate or missing during your audit. Once your updated safety management plan is developed and you have implemented controls to ensure safety compliance, you will need to provide FMCSA with documentation that deficiencies have been rectified and an upgrade to a Satisfactory rating is an appropriate step for your company.

The FMCSA has a user-friendly guide and accompanying form, 385.17 Upgrade Request, outlining how to request an upgrade to your safety rating based on correction action, or visit Acuity’s Motor Carrier Toolbox to learn more.  Source Acuity Insurance